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Posts for: April, 2020

By Laurier Dental
April 24, 2020
Category: Oral Health
Tags: tooth wear  
HowtoKeepToothWearingtoaMinimumasyouAge

One of the unfortunate aspects of aging is tooth wear. Depending on your diet, years of biting and chewing can cause enamel along the biting surfaces to erode. Your body also can't replace enamel — so when it comes to teeth it's not a question of if, but how much your teeth will wear during your lifetime.

To make matters worse, certain conditions cause tooth wear to accelerate. Teeth softened by acids or tooth decay, for example, erode faster than healthier teeth. So will grinding habits: often fueled by stress, these include chewing on hard items like nails, pencils or bobby pins.

You may also grind your teeth, usually while you sleep. Normal biting and chewing produces pressure of about 13 to 23 pounds per square inch: grinding your teeth at night can well exceed this, even up into the hundreds of pounds.

There are some things we can do to alleviate these issues. For clenching and grinding habits, one primary step is to address stress through counseling or biofeedback therapy. For nighttime teeth grinding we can create a bite guard to wear while you sleep that will prevent your teeth from generating abnormal forces.

Finally, it's important that you take care of your teeth through daily oral hygiene, regular office cleanings and checkups, and a nutritious diet for maintaining strong bones and teeth. Keeping your teeth free from diseases that could compromise your enamel as well as other aspects of your mouth will help them stay as strong as possible.

If you would like more information on slowing the rate of tooth wear as you age, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “How and Why Teeth Wear.”


ConcerningYourOralHealthVapingIsntaSafeAlternativetoSmoking

The first week of April is National Public Health Week, putting the spotlight on health issues that impact us all. The popular practice of vaping is one of those top issues this year due to its connection with recent lung illnesses and deaths. But this isn't a new problem—dentists have been critics of vaping for some time now over the growing evidence of its effect on oral health.

Vaping is the popular term for inhaling aerosol vapors through an e-cigarette (or e-cig for short). The electronic device contains a small reservoir filled with flavored liquids that contain nicotine and other chemicals. The device heats the liquid, turning it into a vapor that's inhaled or “vaped” into the lungs.

Vaping has been touted by proponents as a safer alternative to cigarette smoking. But there's growing evidence that vaping isn't a kinder and gentler way to “smoke.” A good portion of that evidence comes from dentists who routinely treat oral problems caused or worsened by vaping.

In reality, the adverse effects of vaping on oral health aren't much different from smoking. Like smoking, vaping ingredients can irritate the inside of the mouth and cause dryness, an ideal environment for dental disease. And nicotine, the main chemical in both vaping and smoking, constricts blood vessels that deliver nutrients and disease-fighting antigens to the gums and teeth.

If these hazards weren't bad enough, recent clinical findings seem to indicate they're only the tip of the iceberg. Researchers from New York University's (NYU) College of Dentistry have found evidence from a combined study of cigarette smokers, e-cig users and non-smokers that vaping may significantly alter the mouth's microbiome to the ultimate detriment of oral health.

A “microbiome” is a term describing the intricate relationship between the millions of microorganisms inhabiting the human body and the body itself. While a few are malicious, many, namely in the gut and mouth, help the body obtain nutrients from food and fight against disease. Disrupting that delicate balance opens the door to diminished health.

The NYU researchers found that both smokers and e-cig users had higher levels of pathogenic bacteria in their saliva than non-smokers, suggesting both habits disrupted the mouth's microbiome balance enough to allow less benevolent bacteria to flourish. They also found that both smokers and e-cig users had significantly higher incidences of gum disease (72.5% and 42.5%, respectively) than non-smokers (28.2%).

If you're a smoker, a cessation program to quit the habit—not switching to vaping—is the way to a healthier life. If you would like more information about the effects of vaping on your oral health, please contact us or schedule a consultation. To learn more, read the Dear Doctor magazine article “Vaping and Oral Health.”


JanetJacksonEvenpopstarsgetinsecureabouttheirsmiles

Multi-platinum recording artist Janet Jackson has long been known for her dazzling smile. And yet, Jackson admitted to InStyle Magazine that her trademark smile was once a major source of insecurity. The entertainer said, “To me, I looked like the Joker!” It was only after age 30 that the pop icon came to accept her unique look.

Jackson is not alone. A study commissioned by the American Association of Orthodontists found that more than one third of U.S. adults are dissatisfied with their smile. But there’s good news—modern dentistry can correct many flaws that can keep you from loving your smile, whether you’re unhappy with the color, size, or shape of your teeth. Here are some popular treatments:

Professional teeth whitening: Sometimes a professional teeth whitening will give you the boost you need. In-office whitening can dramatically brighten your smile in just one visit.

Tooth-colored fillings: If you have silver-colored fillings on teeth that show when you smile, consider replacing them with unnoticeable tooth-colored fillings.

Dental bonding: If you have chipped, cracked, or misshapen teeth, cosmetic bonding may be the fix you’re looking for. In this procedure, tooth colored material is applied to the tooth’s surface, sculpted into the desired shape, hardened with a special light, and polished for a smooth finish.

Porcelain veneers: Dental veneers provide a natural-looking, long-lasting solution to many dental problems. These very thin shells fit over your teeth, essentially replacing your tooth enamel to give you the smile you desire.

Replacement teeth: Is a missing tooth affecting your self-confidence? There are several options for replacing missing teeth, from a removable partial denture to a traditional fixed bridge to a state-of-the-art implant-supported replacement tooth. Removable partial dentures are an inexpensive way to replace one or more missing teeth, but they are less stable than non-removable options. Dental bridges, as the name implies, span the gap where a tooth is missing by attaching an artificial tooth to the teeth on either side of the space. In this procedure, the teeth on both sides of the gap must be filed down in order to support the bridgework. Dental implants, considered the gold standard in tooth replacement technology, anchor long-lasting, lifelike replacements that function like natural teeth.

After coming to embrace her smile, Jackson asserted, “Beautiful comes in all shapes, sizes, and colors." If you don’t feel that your smile expresses the beauty you have inside, call our office to schedule a consultation. It’s possible to love your smile. We can help.

For more information, read Dear Doctor magazine article “How Your Dentist Can Help You Look Younger.”




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